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Seasoning & Spice Recipe Mixes

 

Tomato Puree, Tomato Paste, and Tomato Sauce

   

What is the difference between tomato puree, tomato paste, and tomato sauce
... Tomato paste, or tomato concentrate, consists of tomatoes that have been cooked for several hours, strained and reduced to a thick, rich concentrate. 
... Tomato puree consists of tomatoes that have been cooked briefly and strained, resulting in a thick liquid. 
... Tomato sauce is a somewhat thinner tomato puree, and may include seasonings and other flavorings so that it is ready to be used in other dishes or as a base for other sauces.

 

Any reference to sauces, must include these purchased sauces and spices...

... KC Masterpiece, Premium Original Barbecue Sauce

... McCormick's Montreal Steak Seasoning

... Tabasco's Pepper Sauce

* always season to your taste *

Scoville Scale - How hot is that!

  


 


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Scoville Scale

The Scoville scale is a measure of the hotness of a chilli pepper. These fruits of the Capsicum genus contain capsaicin, a chemical compound which stimulates thermoreceptor nerve endings in the tongue, and the number of Scoville heat units (SHU) indicates the amount of capsaicin present. Many hot sauces use their Scoville rating in advertising as a selling point.

 
It is named after Wilbur Scoville, who developed the Scoville Organoleptic Test in 1912. As originally devised, a solution of the pepper extract is diluted in sugar water until the 'heat' is no longer detectable to a panel of (usually five) tasters; the degree of dilution gives its measure on the Scoville scale. Thus a sweet pepper, containing no capsaicin at all, has a Scoville rating of zero, meaning no heat detectable even undiluted. Conversely, the hottest chiles, such as habaneros, have a rating of 300,000 or more, indicating that their extract has to be diluted 300,000-fold before the capsaicin present is undetectable. The greatest weakness of the Scoville Organoleptic Test is its imprecision, because it relies on human subjectivity.

  
Spice heat is now usually measured by method using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (also known as the "Gillett Method"). This identifies the heat-producing chemicals and weights them according to their relative capacity to produce a sensation of heat. This method actually yields results, not in Scoville units, but in "ASTA pungency units." A measurement of one part capsaicin per million corresponds to about 15 Scoville units, and the published method says that ASTA pungency units can be multiplied by 15 and reported as Scoville units. This conversion is approximate, and some say that there is consensus that it gives results about 20-40% lower than the actual Scoville method would have given.

 

Now That's HOT !!!

Scoville Units

Peppers

0-100

Bell/Sweet pepper varieties

500-1000

New Mexican peppers

1,000-1,500

Espanola peppers.

1,000-2,000

Ancho & Pasilla peppers

1,000-2,500

Cascabel & Cherry peppers

2,500-5,000

Jalapeno & Mirasol peppers

5,000-15,000

Serrano peppers

15,000-30,000

de Arbol peppers

30,000-50,000

Cayenne & Tabasco peppers

50,000-100,000

Chiltepin peppers

100,000-350,000

Scotch Bonnet & Thai peppers

200,000 to 300,000

Habanero peppers

Around 16,000,000

Pure Capsaicin

 

Scoville Heat ratings for TABASCO® brand Sauces

TABASCO® brand SWEET & Spicy Pepper Sauce: 100-600 Scoville Heat Units 
TABASCO® brand Green Pepper Sauce: 600-800 Scoville Heat Units 
TABASCO® brand Garlic Sauce: 1200-1800 Scoville Heat Units 
TABASCO® brand Chipotle Pepper Sauce:2000-2500 Scoville Heat Units
TABASCO® brand Pepper Sauce: 2500-5000 Scoville Heat Units 
TABASCO® brand Habanero Sauce: 7000-8000 Scoville Heat Units